Articles with Category: Headline Stories

What did Davos mean for nature?

The annual gathering of global leaders known colloquially as Davos has been over for a few weeks. While attendees assessed the risks likely to batter the world economy in coming months and years, the World Economic Forum told us environmental threats dominate the list for the third year in row – both in terms of impact and likelihood.

Time to let soil shine: A global agenda for collective action on soil carbon

“It’s too hard and too uncertain,” has long been the response of policymakers and investors in response to working on ways to conserve and improve carbon in soil. But, recent new momentum summarised in a paper in Nature Sustainability and authored by actors from government, science and the private sector offers hope in the form of technical, policy and financial opportunities for rapid progress.

New study: Just five percent of the world’s land mass is untouched by human activity

Just five percent of the world’s land mass is untouched by human activity, according to a new study, highlighting the need to protect areas other than pristine wilderness. Researchers from The Nature Conservancy found 95 percent of the world’s land area, excluding Antarctica, had been modified by people. The study, published in the journal Global Change Biology, suggests the degree to which land is affected by human activity is higher than previously reported.

Can’t see the wood for the trees? Making the most of our forests for biodiversity and wood production

A new paper attempts to answer the very thorny question of how best to maintain the production of wood products while conserving biodiversity? While the land sparing versus land sharing problem is often framed as polar opposites, landscapes can exist anywhere on the sparing-to-sharing spectrum through mixed landscapes. The paper reveals that the best landscape configuration for all species was mixed, containing elements of both sparing and sharing, but was ultimately towards the sparing end of the spectrum.

Buzzing for bees and soil to help the climate

Climate change is impacting some of agriculture’s top pollinators: the bees. One-third of all crop production in the U.S. requires pollination, but in the shadow of climate change, pesticide use, and habitat loss, up to one-third of all honeybee colonies in the U.S. have vanished. One solution that could lessen the impact of climate change now and also in the future is regenerative agriculture.

Amazon indigenous groups propose Mexico-sized corridor of life

Indigenous peoples around the world own or manage much of the planet’s last great storehouses of biodiversity and carbon. In Colombia, indigenous peoples have been working to protect their territories and consolidate their own models of environmental governance for decades. In an expansion of this effort, indigenous groups in the Amazon recently proposed the establishment of “sacred corridor of life and culture,” covering 200 million hectares across the Andean Amazon. As the world’s largest protected area, this corridor would protect critically important biodiversity, like the Lowland Tapir, while keeping millions of tons of carbon out of the atmosphere.

Final N4C thoughts from December’s UN Climate Meeting (COP 24)

Following COP24, countries prepare to submit their next round of national climate commitments. The science is clear that these must be more ambitious if the world is to curb dangerous levels of global temperature rise, and they must include better land-use management and the recognition of nature’s pivotal role in helping slow escalating climate change.