Articles Tagged: The Nature Conservancy

New study: Just five percent of the world’s land mass is untouched by human activity

Just five percent of the world’s land mass is untouched by human activity, according to a new study, highlighting the need to protect areas other than pristine wilderness. Researchers from The Nature Conservancy found 95 percent of the world’s land area, excluding Antarctica, had been modified by people. The study, published in the journal Global Change Biology, suggests the degree to which land is affected by human activity is higher than previously reported.

Amazon indigenous groups propose Mexico-sized corridor of life

Indigenous peoples around the world own or manage much of the planet’s last great storehouses of biodiversity and carbon. In Colombia, indigenous peoples have been working to protect their territories and consolidate their own models of environmental governance for decades. In an expansion of this effort, indigenous groups in the Amazon recently proposed the establishment of “sacred corridor of life and culture,” covering 200 million hectares across the Andean Amazon. As the world’s largest protected area, this corridor would protect critically important biodiversity, like the Lowland Tapir, while keeping millions of tons of carbon out of the atmosphere.

Where mangroves help build strong cities

More mangroves mean safer coastlines in times of duress and flooding. In Indonesia, which holds much of the world’s mangrove forest, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has teamed up with the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC) to explicitly bring nature into the humanitarian cycle of preparedness, response and recovery. Using geospatial technology to help planners and decision-makers examine the potential role of mangroves in providing coastal protection, TNC can successfully integrate nature conservation and disaster management.

Untapped potential of American land to combat climate change

In the wake of the landmark United Nations 1.5 degrees report, a new study shows that efforts to improve land use at a US state level could deliver major results to mitigate climate change. The study shows how the United States’ forests, grasslands and coastal wetlands could play a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought.