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N4C media response to IPCC special report on climate change and land

The IPCC Report on Land confirms what we already know to be true: that we are facing a planetary emergency, that the window for taking decisive action is closing fast and that the costs of inaction will be catastrophic. While the report paints a bleak picture of what could come to pass, it also points a way forward, including opportunities for immediate action. The most important lesson is that the planet has boundaries we must understand and respect. Meeting the Paris climate agreement of staying well below 2 °C can only be achieved if combining the phase-out of fossil fuels with managing all planetary boundaries, particularly land, biodiversity, nitrogen, phosphorus and water.

Nature’s crucial moment at the next UN Climate Summit

At what might be the most high-profile summit on climate change since the 2015 UN conference that led to the Paris Agreement, nature will play a central role as a lead theme and one of the key six ‘action’ areas at the UN Secretary-General summit, during Climate Week. To celebrate and endorse nature’s role as a climate solution and its intrinsic value providing a third of the climate solution by 2030, Nature4Climate will host four days of powerful programming at the Convene 101 Park Avenue and Central Park Zoo from September 22nd to 25th.

The leaders of these sinking countries are fighting to stop climate change

The success of these countries offers a broader lesson: no one nation can solve a problem as complex as climate change alone, but together, bands of nations can make a difference. And that lesson applies to a host of global challenges, from emerging diseases to international terrorism and the spread of nuclear weapons. As states around the world turn inward in response to rising populism, the tiny island nations are showing that international institutions remain not only relevant but also necessary to address the toughest challenges of our generation.

Looking back; looking forward: REDD+

REDD+, which seeks to create financial incentives for forest conservation, has attracted criticism for failing to deliver expected results, and for giving polluters an excuse to avoid reducing their own emissions when forest-based emission reductions are used for offsets. On the other hand, proponents argue that REDD+ is an important way to supplement emission reductions from fossil fuels, and to incentivize emission reductions from land-use change. Nature4climate spoke with Frances Seymour, a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the World Resources Institute and one of the world’s experts on forests.